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Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The firearms world is full of myths, legends, fudd lore, and fairy tales. Some of it is based on half truths, some of it is just made up. This is a small collection of some of crap that you might hear, or might believe yourself, that is purely and totally fake.

Top 7 Firearm Myths & Misconceptions

Top 7 Firearm Myths & MisconceptionsTrending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The firearms world is full of myths, legends, fudd lore, and fairy tales. Some of it is based on half truths, some of it is just made up. This is a small collection of some of crap that you might hear, or might believe yourself, that is purely and totally fake. MFW I read some more fuddy BS I’ve come across some in history books, some in my time as a Marine, and others from the greater gun culture. But today — we’re dispelling them! Firearm Fairy Tales 1. The Shotgun Net of Death I love shotguns, and the shotgun net of death is a firearm fairytale that personally offends me. The reason being is that as a myth its caused a massive counteraction by firearms myth busters. This created a sub myth that the shotgun doesn’t have any spread at close range. Tavor Shotgun shooting! The original myth comes mostly from movies. The idea is that you point a shotgun in the general direction of the bad guy and let loose. Your single round of buckshot will surely destroy whatever is in front of you. No aiming required. Blackpowder driven buckshot throwing a man back 5+ feet… NO! The follow up to the myth that shotguns have no spread has people defending their home with birdshot because, “At close range, it’s basically a slug.” John Woo Wand of Death The truth is, of course, somewhere in the middle. The shotgun doesn’t fire a net of death. Heck, even the old myth of 1 inch per yard is no longer accurate. With modern chokes and different loads, there is no standard way to calculate the spread between different loads. VERY rough guide to chokes. When it comes to shooting, you don’t have to fine-tune your aiming to be effective. With a handgun, you shoot at the heart and lungs to be effective. With a shotgun in a pinch, you can just aim at the torso and still have a very reasonable chance to stop the threat. Shotgun loads like the Federal Flight Control 00 buck sticks together quite closely due to its eight pellet design and excellent shot cup. Kel-Tec KS7 shooting "Federal Flight Control" 00 Buckshot at 15-yards You won’t get that same pattern in Olin Military-grade buckshot, but you still won’t get a net of death. At 10 yards the pattern will be close enough in most guns to stay inside a man-sized torso or even a face shot. It’ll mostly stay in the A zone of an IDPA style target. Shotguns are still awesome weapons, and immensely powerful, and the little spread it has makes it an excellent choice for close quarter’s use. The Benelli M4 , hell ya It’s no net of death, but it’s an effective fight stopper. 2. The Legend of the Undetectable Gun “That punk pulled a Glock 7 on me, you know what that is? It’s a porcelain gun made in Germany. It doesn’t show up on your airport metal detectors and probably costs more than what you make in a month.” With that one quote, Die Hard created a myth about Glock pistols that’s still worth mocking today. The Glock was not made from porcelain but did feature a polymer frame that was somewhat new for the time. However, the slide, spring in the magazine, barrel, and most of the frame parts were metal. Glock Gen 5 , still not made of porcelain. Oh, so is the ammunition. There is no undetectable gun, and as far as I know, there never has been. However, the United States still passed a law prohibiting undetectable firearms. Well, metal-free guns. Good thing we solved that whole “ghost gun” problem back in * checks notes * 1988?! The TSA seems to miss guns all the time, so undetectable is more or less relative. There was a significant uptick in the undetectable guns fairytale when the Liberator premiered as a 3D printable gun. These people ignored the need for metal parts and metal ammunition, but hey what do I know. (left to right) .45 ACP | .429 DE Soft Nose | .429 DE HP | 9mm 3. Revolvers are Inherently More Reliable I’ve had to return or had to have seven guns fixed by the manufacturer. Five of those were revolvers, one was a semi-auto pistol, and the other was a semi-auto rifle. To me, this thoroughly debunked the idea that revolvers are inherently more reliable. A pair of Colt Pythons. (From the collection of Diane Walls). They might look pretty, but they are complex inside! My numerous broken revolvers included free-spinning cylinders, broke cylinder locks, guns that wouldn’t cock into the single-action mode, stuck cylinder releases, and one K frame that would only fire in single action. When revolvers fail, they fail big. Sure they may not jam, but neither does my Glock, CZs, Walthers, or any other quality handgun. Revolvers are more straightforward and easier to fix when it comes to a failure to fire. CZ SP-01, reliable! They aren’t more reliable than quality semi-autos. When a revolver malfunctions, it malfunctions big . In situations where your revolver encounters a hang fire, you can absolutely destroy a revolver. Is timing off? Well great now your gun might be eating small arts of your projectile. Amazing look at how a double-action revolver works (image: C&RSenal ) Fixing a revolver at home is nearly impossible, and unlike an automatic, you can’t simply toss in a replacement part. Most automatics are relatively easy to fix as long as your frame is still intact. Don’t assume all revolvers are bad but don’t buy one because you think they are more reliable. Buy one because you’re a hipster like the rest of us. If you want a gun that is reliable, don’t get a Cobray M11 . If you want to look like a badass, get a Cobray M11 4. The AR 15 Monopod Magazine Myth I first learned this in the Marine Corps during my yearly rifle qualification. Someone asked why they couldn’t rest their rifle on the ground on their magazine. The Primary Marksmanship Instructor informed us that using the magazine as a monopod would cause it to fail. USMC M16A4 with M203 This might have been true decades ago, but magazines have come a very long way since then. Any well-made magazine will no issues being used as a monopod. There is even a base plate that replaces the stock plate with a set of ‘feet’ that turn your magazine into a very effective monopod. Magpul MagPod (image, GunMag Warehouse ) I’ve confirmed this myself, quite a few times. A magazine can be used as a monopod, but it’s not exactly a great monopod. The addition of the Magazine Monopod certainly makes it a much better technique to use. Magpul MagPod - 3 Pack 20 at Gun Mag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 20 at Gun Mag Warehouse Compare prices (3 found) Gun Mag Warehouse (See Price) Amazon (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing You can rest the magazine on the ground or any form of cover, and it will function in your rifle without any kind of issue. I’ve tried it with P-Mags , Lancers , Daniel Defense magazines , and Okay industries aluminum magazines. They all function flawlessly when used as an improvised monopod. Best Magazine Magpul 30 Round PMAG Gen M3 .223/5.56 Magazine 12 at Gun Mag Warehouse Prices accurate at time of writing View Details 12 at Gun Mag Warehouse Compare prices (3 found) Gun Mag Warehouse (See Price) Brownells (See Price) Rainier Arms (See Price) Prices accurate at time of writing 5. The Shockwave from a 50 BMG Can Kill! I remember sitting criss-cross in Boot Camp, listening to my Senior Drill Instructor tell us all sorts of lore. Eventually, somehow we got onto the .50 caliber machine gun known as the M2. My SDI proclaimed that the shockwave from a 50 caliber round could kill someone. What people who have never fired .50 BMG think .50 BMG does when it hits If the bullet just barely missed it could take a man’s arm off! I believed it, well because the Marine Corps is pretty good at making 18-year-olds believe such foolishness. I didn’t know my SDI was a Pog who never deployed much less ever shot a 50 cal at anyone. My Machine gun instructor at the School of Infantry quickly corrected this. Ya’ Boy with an ACOG equipped M249 Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 2009 The myth is utterly ridiculous and how it’s become so mainstream is difficult for me to understand. It leaked out of the military and entered the collective gun consciousness. A video of a deer “dying” from a 50 cal “miss” certainly didn’t help dispel the myth. MFW I watched that stupid video. Of course, this was more likely to be a headshot that entered one eye and left the other. Sure the .50 BMG has a small shockwave, but let’s be real the .50 BMG is big for a bullet but not big compared to nearly anything else in the world. Insert that Dr. Who meme about numbers and relativity. Zach Galifianakis as the next Doctor? Yes? No? Comment below! Jets can create a shockwave powerful enough to break glass, but not powerful enough to rip a person to pieces. To full debunk this firearm’s fairytale we go to Demolition Ranch. Matt put the 50 BMG round against a house of cards, some stacked solo cups and they don’t even fall. This fairy tale is just one of many that have originated from the military. Another that originated from the military is one I like to call: 6. How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Ping Have you ever shot an M1 Garand? If not, you should try it. At least just once. If you haven’t shot one, you are likely familiar with the PING. PING is the noise the gun makes after the last round is fired and the En Bloc clip ejects itself. That ping has to lead many to believe a popular firearm fairytale from WW2 and Korea. The legend has two parts. First, we have the tale of enemy soldiers hearing the ping and knowing that the soldier was now empty. The baddies would then rush the brave American GI and take him out. The second is that GIs learned this and would purposely carry empty En Bloc clips. They could squeeze the clips and then release them to create the ping. Enemy soldiers would then rush into an onslaught of American semi-automatic superiority. Here is the thing. Anyone who’ve ever been in a firefight knows that hearing anything is pretty difficult. Guns are loud, so are grenades, artillery, planes, and everything else that if often on the battlefield. Hearing an individual ping is going to be near impossible. The ping isn’t loud enough to be heard over the gunfire. Also rushing a solider or exposing yourself from cover even if you hear the ping sets you up to get shot in the face. Good luck hearing a single rifle’s PING over the noise of an MG42! Additionally, even if you hear the ping, how would you isolate it to one solider, target that soldier and shoot them before they reload or get behind cover? Plus soldiers don’t fight alone. Just because one guy with an M1 Garand is out of ammo doesn’t mean that all his buddies with their M1s, Tommy guns, 1919s, 1911s, M3, etc. are out of ammo. It’s a fun one, and it even seems possible that it could be true, but it doesn’t stand up to scrutiny. Bloke at the Range made an excellent video on this very subject. 7. Winter is Coming with the M1 Carbine Speaking of M1s, let’s do one of my favorite Firearm’s Fairytales. Not to save the best for last, but I won’t bring one out that combines fudd lore, fantasy, and a military myth. This final Firearms Fairytale revolves around the M1 and M2 carbines, thick winter jackets, and inaccuracy. Modern M1 Carbine from Auto Ordnance The M1 Carbine is one of my favorite firearms. It’s such a fun gun and its chamber in the unique .30 Carbine cartridge. The .30 carbine is a handy little cartridge that’s pretty powerful. It sits between a pistol and rifle round. It proved its worth in WW2 and later Korea. However, in the latter, it became a little less beloved. It had a few issues relating to Cold Weather reliability for sure. However, this wasn’t the only issue related to the .30 Carbine and the cold. Reportedly the M1/M2 Carbine failed to penetrate the thick and likely frozen over jackets worn by the Korean and Chinese soldiers. Group of Soviet solders feeding polar bears from a tank, 1950. (image, RareHistoricalPhotos ) The jacket was a Soviet design and I’d reckon those fellas surely know a thing or two about cold weather and war. At the time when compared to the .30-06 fired from the M1 Garand, the 30 Carbine would appear to be anemic. In reality, the 30 Carbine was a hot little round when used within 200 yards. (L to R) 5.56 NATO, .300 BLK, and .30 Carbine The .30 Carbine is equivalent to a standard .357 magnum fired from a rifle. Really, the .30 Carbine has no problem punching through frozen winter jackets at the .30 Carbines effective range. So… why does this myth exist? Well, it’s likely because soldiers were missing with entire magazines at 100 yards. That’s not a slight at our Korean veterans. As a machine gunner, I lit off way more than 15 or 30 rounds in a firefight and hit nothing. Take it from a machine gunner, this isn’t how to use full auto. People miss, they miss a lot in war. Especially when someone else is shooting at you while you’re shooting at them. The Brothers Colt and Their Firearms Fairytales Firearms Fairytales, myths, and lore are quite present. These are the ones I’ve heard most often. But there are dozens, even hundreds more. Some of them are strange and blatantly wrong, some are closer to the truth than you might think. With that in mind, what firearm fairy tales have you heard? Let us know below! If you want some study material so might guard against firearm fairy tales, take a look at our Beginner’s Guide to Guns !

The 4 Best .308 BDC Scopes – Reviews 2020 Photo by Oleksii Leonov / CC BY The .308 is one of America’s favorite cartridges--perfect for hunting medium to large game, common, and quite effective up to a thousand yards. To realize the full potential of the .308, however, you’d either need the eyes of an eagle or a quality optic. But a good scope is just one part of the equation; the reticle inside the scope can also make a big difference. A bullet drop compensator, or BDC, is a reticle that allows the shooter to reach out and touch targets with ease. A BDC is calibrated for a particular round and allows the shooter to use a series of hash marks to make hitting large range targets easy. Simply place the appropriate hash mark for the range on the target and pull the trigger. A BDC is supposed to make shooting easier, quicker, and more accurate. Below are our recommendations for the 4 best .308 BDC scopes on the market. Take a gander, why don’t you? ACOG .308 Trijicon TA11J-308 ACOG 3.5x35mm Dual Illuminatedx 40mm, Red Crosshair .308 Ballistic Reticle with TA51 Mount, Black Price: Price as of 08/14/2020 15:45 PDT (more info) Product prices and availability are accurate as of the date/time indicated and are subject to change. Any price and availability information displayed on Amazon.com at the time of purchase will apply to the purchase of this product. Trijicon struck gold when they designed the ACOG rifle scope. The Acog has since been adopted by both the U.S. Marines and the U.S. Army and proven itself to be incredibly effective. In fact, Marines in Fallujah were investigated because of how many headshots they achieved with their Acog-equipped rifles! The Acog is produced for both the 5.56 and 7.62/308 calibers. This model has a 3.5 power magnification and uses a combination of fiber optics and tritium to illuminate the internal reticle. This means you have battery-free illumination. The Acog’s .308 ballistic reticle ( see full specs ) gives the shooter an excellent system for both close and long range. The bullet drop compensator has the ability to reach out to 1,200 yards with confidence and precision. Of course, as a shooter, you have to be able to master the fundamentals of shooting long range. The illuminated chevron combined with the Bindon Aiming concept allows the optic to be used effortlessly at close range. The Trijicon Acog line of optics are well made optics. They are designed to get beaten up, tossed around, and used in actual combat. The Acog is water and shockproof to an extreme level. It’s also an excellent choice if you’re .308 platform is a semi-automatic rifle like the AR 10 or the SCAR 17. If you’re willing to shell out the dough, this is the best .308 BDC scope period. Trijicon ACOG What's the Big Deal? Watch this video on YouTube

5 Easy Steps On How To Clean A Gun (2020)

5 Easy Steps On How To Clean A Gun (2020)

Mechanical devices demand regular and proper maintenance.  This certainly includes all firearms which do require a good cleaning and lubrication after use to keep their operational performance at a peak for a survival scenario. Generally, though, regular maintenance does not imply that a firearm needs to be disassembled to the last screw and spring in order to clean it.  Any firearm can get a basic fundamental cleaning in five quick steps. Quick Navigation How To Clean a Gun: All You Need to Know 1. Unload and Remove Bolt 2. Swab Bore 3. Scrub Bore 4. Run Bore with Patches 5. Apply Light Lubrication How To Clean a Gun: All You Need to Know 1. Unload and Remove Bolt Before cleaning any gun, open the action to make sure it is unloaded, and then read the owner’s manual for specific gun model instructions.  Remove clips or magazines.  Take out the bolt in a rifle, or lock open the action of a semi-auto rifle, shotgun, or pistol.  Brush with solvent, clean, dry off, and lightly lube the bolt.  Make sure you brush the extractor and/or ejector as well. 2. Swab Bore Set the cleaned bolt aside and working from the breech or chamber end only run a cleaning rod with attached bronze brush soaked in gun solvent down the barrel and out the muzzle.  Repeat this same action if the barrel is particularly dirty.  Let it sit for 10-15 minutes.  This allows the solvent to dissolve and soften bullet jacket material, lead, and powder fowling. Hoppe's Elite Gun Cleaner Spray Bottle, 8 Ounces Hoppes Elite gun Cleaner meets the demands of professional shooters, military and law enforcement by... Penetrates down to the steel's molecular pores, removing carbon, lead, and most copper fouling See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 08:48 / Affiliate links / Images from Amazon Product Advertising API Do You Have Concealed Carry Weapon Insurance? Self-defense can land you into major legal battles, or even jail . USCCA provides top-class CCW insurance plus training for you and your family at $22/mo with $2,000,000 in coverage. Join USCCA 3. Scrub Bore After the solvent soak, run the solvent soaked bronze brush down the barrel again several times to loosen the gunk in the barrel.  Purists would say to unscrew the brush at the muzzle at each stroke of the cleaning rod rather than pulling it back up and out the chamber.  If you are a professional target shooter, this extra effort might make a difference, however for the average everyday deer rifle or .22 LR, this is not necessary.  You make that judgment for your gun especially if the application is law enforcement or security or the like. After ten or so runs of the brush, I do recommend next running a cloth patch down the bore to push any excess carbon out the muzzle. In this case do not pull the patch back out.  Take it off the rod, put on a clean one, and then pull the rod back out the chamber end.  Repeat again with the brush scrubbing.  As a rule of thumb on most hunting guns running the brush 25 times should do the job. 4. Run Bore with Patches Next run several solvent soaked patches down the barrel and out the muzzle end.  Replace each time with a clean patch, pull back up, and replace patch again. Do this until you are satisfied with the relative cleanliness of the patch. They may never come out completely white, but if they come out black, with shades of blue and green, then keep cleaning. Solvent can turn a lot of barrel fowling bluish or green. If this continues, you may need to soak the barrel again, rest it, and then brush again. It all depends on how many rounds were shot since the last cleaning.  If you deer hunted and shot the gun a half dozen times in a season that is of course much different than running 500 rounds through a .22 rimfire rifle, or a .223 AR rifle on the shooting range or a 9mm handgun doing police qualification shooting. Another great tool for cleaning the bore of your rifle or pistol is Hoppe's Bore Snake .  Here is a quick video product review of the Bore Snake.  I own a few of these (Joel) and had success using them. 5. "Apply Light Lubrication" Contrary to popular belief guns do not perform well swimming in oil. After all the swabbing and scrubbing, the barrel just needs a light coat of rust prevention oil as does the bolt. Use a clean soft cotton cloth with oil to wipe down all the metal surfaces of the gun.  A very little on the wood stock does not hurt it.  Don’t overdo oil. I do this final step wearing those $1 brown cotton gloves to keep fingerprints from ending up on the metal before storage. As to storage, do not put any firearm in any kind of a sealed case, either fabric or plastic for long term.  If you do, add a packet of moisture desiccant in the case, otherwise, just prop the gun up safely locked in a closet or secure area.  Ammo should be kept in a place separate from guns. Are there other steps that could be added?  Sure.  Use a clean toothbrush to dust in the juncture of the barrel where fitted to the stock.  Brush off sights, mounts, scope metal, too.  Clean optical lenses like any high quality glass.   Brush around the trigger area.  Clean the clip or magazine and oil lightly.  Brush up into the magazine insert cavity below the action.  Brush off the butt plate that usually ends up in the dirt. There you have completed a basic gun cleaning to prepare for a survival situation.  Be sure to check the gun ever so often to make sure no rusting has slipped up on the metal surfaces.  It is also a good idea before shooting your gun again to run a dry patch down the barrel to clean out any left over oil or dust.   If you continue to maintain your guns after each use, they will be ready when you need them. Best Gun Cleaning Kits You also buy ready-to-go cleaning kits to make this process easier. Here are our most recommended kits: Preview Product Rating GLORYFIRE Universal Gun Cleaning Kit Hunting Rifle Handgun Shot Gun... No ratings yet See Price on Amazon Otis Technologies FG-750 Cleaning System, Tactical, Clam Package No ratings yet See Price on Amazon Last update on 2020-08-14 at 04:28 / Affiliate links / Images from "Amazon Product Advertising" API Photos by: Dr. Woods, Chris Vesely , US Navy Other interesting articles: How To Clean and Eat Skunk Glock – Ultimate Survival Pistol in 2020 PDW – Do You Really Need One? 2020 Debate KEL-TEC KSG: Survival Gun Review for 2020

Training: Sharpen Your Skills With Laser Training Devices

Training: Sharpen Your Skills With Laser Training Devices

/* custom css */.td_uid_2_5f379d5c40a98_rand.td-a-rec-img { text-align: left; } .td_uid_2_5f379d5c40a98_rand.td-a-rec-img img { margin: 0 auto 0 0; } Practice doesn’t have to stop when you leave the range with the aid of laser training devices. Why are laser training devices good options for non-live-fire training? Laser training devices allow shooters to stage drills that simulate specific situations. They're excellent for new shooters, teaching safety basics before welding a live firearm. There are many brands — LaserLyte, Laser Ammo and Next Level Training, etc. These include systems that utilize faux firearms or actual weapons systems. Paired with regular live-fire training, laser devices can have a big impact on shooters. It doesn’t matter if it’s your life, your pride or a championship on the line. Nothing is more important than hitting your target when it matters most. That’s why the best shooters train, and they train often. They spend countless hours on the range shooting live ammo and going through all the motions they expect to use on the range or on the street. Setting out several targets is a great way to work on your speed in transitioning between targets, as can be seen in this setup from Laser Ammo. It’s also loads of fun. That’s because there is no better practice than live-fire drills that simulate specific situations. Sometimes, though, live-fire training just isn’t an option. Life has a way of interrupting time at the range, and for many of us, the cost of live ammo is enough to keep us from shooting as often as we should. It’s easy to burn through $100 or more in just a few hours. “Many ranges do not allow you to practice drawing, either, so if you don’t have access to a range that does, your next best option is to use a laser training device,” says Laser Ammo spokesman Colin Gallagher, a retired police officer and former contestant on Top Shot. “Other than the initial cost of the equipment, there are no expenses associated with using a laser training device, either. You can shoot thousands of times, and it won’t cost you anything other than maybe some batteries.” That’s why serious shooters don’t just rely on live-fire practice: They use laser training tools at every opportunity. Related GunDigest Articles 7 Defensive Handgun Training Myths AR-15 Training and Practice Drills Defensive Firearms Training: Episodic vs. Immersion “It doesn’t replace live fire. You must practice with live ammo as often as possible, but a laser trainer lets you practice things like drawing, trigger control and target acquisition virtually anywhere. You can set up several reactive targets and practice moving just like in a competition or even a personal defense situation,” adds Gallagher. “They are also great safety training tools for beginning shooters and even advanced shooters. We have a training pistol that emits a warning sound any time the finger enters the trigger guard before the gun is raised. That can help reduce negligent discharges.” How They Work The mechanics of laser training devices are pretty simple, at least from a technological perspective. They use a laser beam emitted from a device, either a bullet-shaped laser that actually fits into a gun’s chamber, a rod that is inserted into the barrel, or a stand-alone dummy gun that has a built-in laser device. Squeezing the trigger results in an instantaneous beam that takes the place of an actual bullet. Unlike a laser sight, the beam cuts off after a fraction of a second. That’s all that is needed to send a beam to a reactive target that responds to the light. This LaserLyte .223 Rem. laser trainer fits inside the AR’s chamber. Firing activates the laser, and a built-in snap cap protects the firing pin. If you shoot at a reactive target, you’ll get instant feedback in the form of a sound, a light on the target at the point of impact, or both. That is, assuming you actually hit the target. A miss won’t register. So Many Choices LaserLyte and Laser Ammo, for example, have a variety of reactive targets that are designed to increase your draw and shot speed thanks to a timer, as well as some that are meant mostly as a fun way to improve your skills. They include everything from electronic cans that vibrate and spin when you make an accurate shot to targets that imitate the ding of a bullet striking a steel plate. Some even use changing colors to simulate a “shoot, don’t shoot” situation. Gallagher says Laser Ammo’s products are accurate to about 130 yards. “They can be good training devices for snipers, too,” he adds. Even better? Training simulators use everything from shooting games to real-life situations played through a gaming console or laptop. The scene can be projected on a wall or other large canvas for more life-like simulation. It also uses laser technology to register hits, even when you are shooting at targets projected on a wall.

KKM Precision Barrels: The Evolution of Accuracy

For 25 years, KKM has produced match grade pistol barrels and has a well deserved reputation for excellence. If you want to shoot little groups through paper or bad guys, KKM can help. They will drop into any Glock from Gen 1 to Gen 5 and turn your plinker into a shooter. KKM Precision was founded to make highly accurate pistol barrels for competition use. They are family owned and all American made. Combining state of the art multi-axis CNC machinery and their unique Button Rifling process KKM provides the very best products at reasonable prices. Their secret is not so secret, they talk about it all the time, their unique button rifling process . They pull a titanium nitride-coated carbide button under tons (literally) of pressure, displacing the metal to producing a rifled bore. The result is a uniform mirror-like finish down the entire barrel. The KKM process produces a more accurate bore diameter, cleaner surface finish and better hardness, with a more uniform rate of twist. At the beginning of WW2, Americans realized that the cut rifling methods then in use couldn’t produce quality barrels fast enough for the War Department. Button rifling had been around for awhile, but it was perfected by Remington and the Hart Barrel Company and recruited into the war effort. KKM makes their own buttons and tooling in house using highly specialized equipment. They do a tremendous amount of testing with different bore configurations and twist rates. You can request a custom twist if you want. Their innovation keeps them at the bleeding edge of competitive shooting. Because a single button can produce thousands of barrels before wearing, they can keep prices down. Because the buttons are precisely sized, they can maintain a high level of quality control. I carry Glocks and shoot them in competition. While they come out of the box very rugged and reliable, they don’t live up to their accuracy potential without a little help. Glock factory barrels are hammer-forged forming female type polygonal rifling with a right-hand twist. The Glock process involves beating a slowly rotating mandrel through the bore to obtain the hexagonal or octagonal shape. One look down the bore and you can see the difference. The lands of conventional rifling look like the cogs on a gear, polygonal rifling looks like rounded bulges rising from the bore. Because more of the bullet’s bearing surface is in contact with the bore in polygonally rifled barrels, lead bullets smear the bore with a thin coating of lead qhich can build to dangerious levels. Glock recommends against the use of reloads and lead bullets for this reason. In 1939, (way before Mr. Glock of Austria developed his pistols) the Germans were faced with the challenge of making a million (literally) machine gun barrels. The Nazi’s had a killer new gun, the MG-42 . Shooting 12,000 rounds a minute, it came with two barrels and wore them out like nobody’s business. German engineers came up with the hammer forging process which made tough barrels fast using a lower grade steel than traditional methods. Win – win. Hammer forged rifling kept the Allies heads down until 1945. The first hammer forging machines were built in Erfurt, Germany in 1939. In 1945, those hammer forging machines were shipped off to Austria ahead of the invading Russians and American technicians were the first to look at them. I don’t know what Gaston Glock was doing in 1945, but maybe he got a look at them too. KKM barrels are made using certified 416R gun-barrel quality stainless steel bar stock. The barrels are then heat treated and vacuum tempered. CNC machining produces superior dimensional tolerances over mass produced factory barrels. KKM’s Glock barrels come with buttom Rifling and fully supported SAAMI spec. match chambers for shooting factory or reloaded ammunition. Button rifling is a far more expensive and time consuming process then broached/cut rifling, but the gains in accuracy are far greate. KKM’s extensive knowledge of precision long range bench rest shooting has taught them that the bore has to be dimensionally perfect from the chamber to the muzzle to shoot at distances greater than 1000 yards. In a rifle barrel the bullet has time to stabilize in the bore but in a 5inch pistol barrel there is very little time for this to happen. KKM National Match barrels routinely shoot sub one-inch groups at 50 yards. Only button rifling can achieve this level of accuracy. I have two KKM barrels, both 9mm, one for the Glock 34 and another for the Glock 17 . I have put several thousand rounds of every kind of 9mm through them with great results. Why yes, since you asked, they are dirty and a little worn. They don’t come from KKM like that, you have to shoot a bit. This is a custom G-34 I built with Tridentis Tactical for the KKM barrel. The slide is from Lone Wolf with green Cerakote . I had them bead blast the KKM barrel to take down the shine and match the slide. The Fulcrim trigger is a joy to shoot. At a recent Tactical Performance Center Instructor Boot Camp I fired 2000 rounds of jacked reloads through my the KKM barrel on my Glock 17 in a single week. The first thing I noticed about the KKM barrels was they dropped right in to the slide. Accurate match barrels have the reputation of being a little over sized, so I was prepared to do some fitting. Both of my KKM barrels dropped right in with a tighter fit than the Glock barrels, which delivers a tighter lockup than the stock barrel and chamber itself is a little tighter. The fit and finish are beautiful. The KKM Precision barrels add a little character to your stock gun. You can see the attention do details. You notice the groups as soon as you start shooting. They are smaller. If you do your job, they are very small. With a red dot sight and a KKM barrel, I can put 10 rounds in a single ragged hole at 10 yards. No matter how well you shoot with factory barrels, you will get better hits with KKM. The KKM reliability is the same as factory, but now I can shoot reloads and lead bullets if I want and nothing blows up. I recommend that before you buy a KKM barrel, go shoot the snot out of your factory barrel at some place like the "Tactical Performance Center" . When your groups start to get smaller, upgrade to a KKM barrel and see what American innovation can do for your shooting. You will be amazed. If you want an extended barrel or a threaded barrel for a compensator or a supressor? KKM is your best option. You can get KKM barrels here . Photo courtesy of KKM.

Competition Weekend!

I will be shooting at an event this weekend, and will be cleaning up my blog for spring cleaning. I Will be back soon! Share: Google Twitter Facebook Pinterest Reddit More Tumblr LinkedIn Pocket Email Print

Summary

Trending: Best Places to Buy Ammo Online and [Buyer's Guide] 7 Best AR-15s The firearms world is full of myths, legends, fudd lore, and fairy tales. Some of it is based on half truths, some of it is just made up. This is a small collection of some of crap that you might hear, or might believe yourself, that is purely and totally fake.